Tag Archives: jerusalem

Jerusalem Municipality and the First World War

Open Jerusalem team member Falestin Naïli will participate to the international conference on “The First World War in the Middle East: Experience, knowledge, memory” jointly organized by the OIB Orient-Institut Beirut, the Ifpo (Institut français du Proche-Orient), the History Department of the Université Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth and the Institute for Palestine Studies (3-4 November 2014) with a paper on “La guerre entre les lignes : la municipalité ottomane de Jérusalem face aux effets de la Première Guerre mondiale.”

Opening Jerusalem Archives: for a connected history of ‘Citadinité’ in the Holy City (1840-1940)

IMG_5699• Jerusalem is undoubtedly one of the cities that receives the most attention from historians, but the available bibliography, generally speaking, is plagued by three major flaws. First, most studies are devoted either to ancient and medieval history, or to the very recent history of the city (after the 1948 War). The Ottoman period (1517-1917) and the British Mandate (1917-1947) are decidedly less studied, as though only the Bible, the Crusades, and then the Israeli-Palestinian conflict were worthy of interest. The second flaw stems in part from the first : the overwhelming majority of existing studies focus on religious and geopolitical aspects of the city’s history and thus Jerusalem appears either as a jumble of shrines or as a battlefield. The third flaw is the cause of the other two: most Jerusalem historians limit their studies to the history of only one community of the Holy City, thus contributing to the creation of a segmented historical narrative that precludes a more sweeping view of the city.

Continue reading Opening Jerusalem Archives: for a connected history of ‘Citadinité’ in the Holy City (1840-1940)