Tag Archives: IFPO

Call for applications: Summer School ‘Reading and analysing Ottoman manuscript sources’

The French Institute of the Near East (Ifpo), the Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB), the University of Balamand, the Lebanese University (Doctoral School of Literature, Humanities and Social Sciences), the Center for Turkish, Ottoman, Balkan and Centralasian Studies (CETOBaC), the Ankara Sosyal Bilimler Üniversitesi, the İbn Haldun Üniversitesi, and the Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies (JaCMES) with the support of the Open Jerusalem project are organising a summer school devoted to reading and analysing Ottoman manuscript sources. This is the second edition, following the summer school of 2016 in Amman, Jordan.

During the four-day programme we will introduce young researchers (mostly MA and PhD candidates, but postdocs may also apply) to reading, combining and analysing manuscript sources from various archives of the Ottoman era, produced at local, provincial and imperial levels. We concentrate mainly on materials from the 16th and 20th centuries, but welcome also explorations into earlier archives. Our summer school offers future researchers introductory presentations of the archival situation, various types of sources and basic research tools and workshops with a focus on the actual work with texts. The aim is to overcome the initial difficulties researchers often face when working with archival material from the Ottoman period, one of which is an administrative terminology no longer in use today.

Our programme emerged from several observations. First, young historians often feel helpless when faced with difficult Ottoman archival material in Ottoman Turkish or other languages used in the Empire if they have not had proper training in palaeography and philology. Moreover, there is not enough dialogue and exchange between the different schools of Ottoman history, particularly between those focusing on the analysis of imperial dynamics (who are generally specialists in the Ottoman language) and those who concentrate on the provinces of the Empire and who therefore work on sources produced in local languages. Our summer school will focus on the study of archives in Ottoman Turkish and Arabic, in case also in Armenian and other languages, so as to provide future historians with the skills necessary to use such sources within the framework of their research projects.

The objective of including these three languages of the empire in one summer school is two-fold: firstly, to foster an exchange around theory and methodology among specialists of different regions of the empire. Secondly, the three languages are important for a comprehensive analysis of local dynamics in various provinces, either for administrative, economic and social dynamics or more specifically in religious studies and belles-lettres. An additional aim is to encourage the use of source materials in different languages by facilitating the identification and understanding of diverse archival holdings. Bringing together specialists of different regions and subjects will encourage the exchange of information on archival holdings, their history, catalogues and finding aids.

How?

This summer school is an initiative of the Ifpo, the OIB, the University of Balamand, the Lebanese University (Doctoral School of Literature, Humanities and Social Sciences), Ankara Sosyal Bilimler Üniversitesi, İbn Haldun Üniversitesi, the CETOBaC, the JaCMES and other Lebanese partners to be defined.

The focus of the summer school are practical workshops in small groups allowing trainees to read and discuss archival documents with specialists familiar with different types of documents. These workshops will make up more than half of the training, the other part including visits of archives in and around Beirut, presentations of Ottoman archives and research aids in palaeography, and discussions about methodology.

In a workshop, the students will be asked to read and analyse a document of their choice.

The summer school will accept up to 20 students. About ten researchers and professors from Arab, Turkish, German and French universities will attend the summer school as instructors.

The main working language of the summer school is English.

Who?

Students enrolled in a Master or Ph.D. programme as well as researchers in an early post-doctoral stage, regardless of nationality, can apply for this summer school, provided that his or her research project necessitates the use of Ottoman source materials in Ottoman Turkish, Arabic or Armenian (or other relevant languages).

The students selected for the summer school will be offered the following free of charge:

  • summer school fees
  • lunch and dormitory accommodation during the summer school
  • round-trip air transportation from their country of residence
  • excursions and visits.

In order to be considered, the applications must include:

  • a proposal outlining the candidate’s research project and archival sources (two pages maximum)
  • a curriculum vitae, mentioning language skills (two pages maximum)
  • name and contact of 2 referees that may be contacted for a recommendation

Around fifteen students will be selected for participation in this summer school. The applications must be submitted in English and sent to this address: ottomansummerschool2016@gmail.com

When?

The applications must be submitted before 15 June 2017 (midnight Beirut time).

You will receive a reply by 25 June 2017.

The summer school will take place from 27 to 30 August 2017. Arrival day in Beirut is 26 August, departure is foreseen for 31 August at the earliest.

Where?

The summer school will take place in Beirut and Balamand, Lebanon.

List of potential instructors

Simon Abdel Massih (Lebanese University), Metin Atmaca (Ankara Sosyal Bilimler Üniversitesi), Marc Aymes (CETOBaC), Fatih Çalısır (Ibn Haldun University), Antranig Dakessian (Haigazian University Beirut), Aylin De Tapia (IFEA), Vanessa Guéno (Ifpo), Mahmoud Haddad (University Balamand), Astrid Meier (OIB), Serife Memis Eroglu (Hacettepe University), Falestin Naili (Ifpo), Norig Neveu (Ifpo), Abdallah Said (Lebanese University), Souad Slim (University of Balamand), Faruk Yaslıçimen (Ibn Haldun University) and others.

Jerusalem through the Hebrew Press

Ifpo & IFJ

are pleased to invite you to a public lecture by
  تقدم محاضرة لـ 
Abdul-Hameed Al-Kayyali (Ifpo, Research Associate, Department of Medieval and Modern Arabic Studies / Open Jerusalem)
عبد الحميد الكيالي- المعهد الفرنسي للشرق الأدنى- عمّان
Hassan Ahmad Hassan (University of Jordan, Faculty of Foreign Languages)
حسن أحمد حسن- الجامعة الأردنية- كلية اللغات الأجنبية
 القدس نهاية الفترة العثمانية في عيون الصحافة العبرية: مقاربة نقدية
Late Ottoman Jerusalem Through the Eyes of the Hebrew Press : A Critical Approach
Lecture in Arabic / المحاضرة بالعربية
     (في المعهد الفرنسي (عمان، جبل الويبدة
    الثلاثاء، 14 آذار/ مارس 2017 في الساعة السادسة مساءً
Tuesday, March 14th 2017 at 6 pm – Institut français (Amman,  Jabal al-Weibdeh)
عمومًا، تُعد الصحافة المحلية مصدرًا أوليًا للتاريخ المحلي والمدني، وفي سياق الحقبة العثمانية المتأخرة برزت هذه الصحافة كأداة فاعلة في شرعنة المدينة بوصفها فضاءً تشاركيًا في المجتمع. في ضوء هذه الفكرة الأساسية وغيرها، يتناول الباحثان، وبشكل نقدي، جوانب محددة من المجال العام للقدس كما تعرضه أحد أبرز الصحف العبرية في فلسطين العثمانية. 
It is widely held that local press is an important primary source for local and urban history. In the context of late Ottoman Jerusalem this press emerged as an active tool in legitimating the city as shared unit of society. In the light of this idea and others, the two researchers critically address certain aspects of Jerusalem’s public sphere as portrayed in one of the most prominent Hebrew newspapers in Ottoman Palestine.
 
Al-Kayyali, historian, holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Aix-Marseille in the “Studies of Arab and Muslim World”. He focuses in his research on the question of “cultural and religious interrelations” that includes: Arab Jews​ ​in general and​ Jerusalemite Jews in late Ottoman and Mandatory Palestine.
عبد الحميد الكيالي: باحث في مجال التاريخ، يحمل درجة الدكتوراة في “دراسات العالم العربي والإسلامي” من جامعة إكس- مرسيليا، ويركز في أبحاثه على العلاقات المتبادلة في بعديْها الثقافي والديني، والتي تتضمن اليهود العرب بشكل عام، ويهود القدس في نهاية الفترة العثمانية والانتداب البريطاني في فلسطين.
Hassan, historian and linguist, holds a master degree from University of Jordan in “Jewish Studies”. He focuses in his research on the question of Hebrew press in late Ottoman and mandatory Palestine.
حسن أحمد: باحث في مجاليْ التاريخ واللغة، يحمل درجة الماجستير في الدراسات اليهودية من الجامعة الأردنية، ويركز في أبحاثه على الصحافة العبرية في نهاية الفترة العثمانية والانتداب البريطاني في فلسطين.

The Ottoman municipality of Jerusalem: lecture by Falestin Naili

ottoman

Open Jerusalem team member Falestin Naili will give a lecture on “The Ottoman Municipality of Jerusalem: How to reconstruct the history of a forgotten urban institution” at the CBRL British Institute in Amman on 14th December 2014 at 6 pm.

فلسطين نايلي  سوف تعطي محاضرة عن

بلدية القدس العثمانية : كيفية صياغة تاريخ مؤسسة طي النسيان

في المعهد البريطاني في عمان 

14 ديسمبر 

في الساعة السادسة مساء

affichecbrl_ifpo_5_1024

New Perspectives for Jerusalem’s Late Ottoman and Mandate Social History

by Falestin Naili

The round-table entitled “New Perspectives for Jerusalem’s Late Ottoman and Mandate Social History: Sources and Resources in Jordan” was held on the 24th of November 2014 at the Ifpo Amman. Supported by the Ifpo and the ERC-financed research project “Opening Jerusalem Archives: For a Connected History of ‘Citadinité’ in the Holy City (1840-1940)”, this round-table was conceived and organised by Falestin Naili, research associate at the Ifpo Amman and member of the ERC project. It brought together four members of the ERC project with their colleagues of the University of Jordan in order to present and discuss their respective research in relationship to the ERC project’s aim of overcoming the segmented historiography of Jerusalem by opening and interconnecting the city’s archives and laying the framework for an urban history approach to Jerusalem.

The round-table was welcomed by Vanessa Guéno (Ifpo Amman), who underlined that the Ifpo is currently relaunching the Ottoman studies and who emphasized the possibilities of future synergies between the Open Jerusalem Project and Ifpo Research Programs.

Vincent Lemire, executive director of the ERC Open-Jerusalem Project, briefly presented the scope, the scientific framework and the global schedule of the ERC project (2014-2019). He underlined the importance of Jordan’s archival sources and institutional actors dealing with Jerusalem’s history. Hence, he explained that the ERC project team was eager to meet their colleagues from the Center for Manuscripts and Documents and the Committee for the History of the Bilad Al Sham of the University of Jordan in Amman.

In her presentation entitled “Jerusalem, Amman, Beirut and beyond: moving from the Jerusalem municipal archives to the collective memory of Ottoman Jerusalem in search of citadinité (urban citizenship)”, Falestin Naili presented the first results of her analysis of the Arabic minutes of Ottoman Jerusalem’s municipal council for the period from 1892 – 1917, which account for about 45% of this rare primary source. These hand-written minutes document the decisions and announcements of the council (founded several years before the Ottoman Provincial Law on Municipalities of 1877) and offer a wealth of information and many glimpses of daily life issues in Jerusalem. About two-thirds of the members of the municipal council were elected and one third were ex officio members. Muslims, Christians and Jews were among the members and the Ottoman government chose the mayor among the elected members. After a short digression into the material and palaeographic aspects of the minutes, Falestin Naili gave examples of the issues dealt with in the municipal minutes, emphasizing that revenue-generating activities were an important preoccupation of this urban institution spearheading Jerusalem’s development of modern infrastructures and services. As an interconfessional interethnic urban institution interacting directly with the citizens and the imperial authorities, the municipality was probably the most important mediating structure for Jerusalem’s urban society, translating imperial impulses into local activities and relaying local realities and initiatives back to Istanbul. This new picture of Jerusalem’s society at the end of the Ottoman period should be complemented by several other sources, such as court registers, local press, imperial documents and, last but not least, autobiographical writings and collective memory narratives from this period.

Yasemin Avci, Associate Professor at the University of Pamukkale and member of the ERC team, presented her analysis of the Ottoman language minutes (about 55% of the total text) of Jerusalem’s municipal council for the period from 1892 – 1917 and their link with the imperial level of governmentin a paper entitled “Jerusalem Municipal Archives and Istanbul Imperial Archives: how to interconnect the two levels”. She explained that the resolutions of the municipal council are in a rough draft format, since they were for the internal use of the council itself. Nonetheless, they could occasionally be inspected by central government authorities. She then placed the municipal council back into the new governmental structure created as a result of the Tanzimat reforms, which signified the development of a legal authoritarian regime in the Ottoman Empire. Within the pyramidal structure extending from Istanbul to the provinces and sanjaks, the municipal council was at the bottom as a means of connecting urban administration to the imperial center. Although the objective of the creation of municipalities was not democratic, the municipal councils could at times nuance, circumvent and even subvert imperial intentions in their desire to assert varying degrees of autonomy.

amman

Abdul-Hameed Al-Kayyali, associated researcher at Ifpo Amman and member of the ERC project, presented the first results of his ongoing research on Jerusalem’s Hebrew press in a paper entitled “The Hebrew newspaper Ha-Zvi: a mirror of Jerusalem’s public affairs at the turn of the century”. The Hebrew press, and in particular Ha-Zvi (later called Ha-Or) for the period between 1840 and 1940 (available online www.jpress.org.il) provides some specific information which cannot be found in the minutes of the Jerusalem municipal council, such as the names of candidates for municipal elections. Furthermore, they provide many detailed accounts of daily life (schools, hospitals, transport, water etc.) in Jerusalem, mainly from the perspective of the city’s Jewish inhabitants. The work on Ha-Zvi is relatively easier than that on other newspapers, since (as a publication directed by Eliezer Ben Yehuda, the «father» of Modern Hebrew) it contains a simpler Hebrew with less Talmudic and Yiddish terms than other newspapers of that period.

Nufan Al Sawariah, Professor in the History Department of the University of Jordan, presented a paper entitled “Water and its resources in Jerusalem: The Registers of Jerusalem’s mahkame shar‘iyya as a source of study”. He emphasized that the sijill shar ‘i has to be considered as an important mirror of life in Jerusalem, reflecting a large number of people’s everyday preoccupations. One of the most important daily life issues in Jerusalem was the regular cutting of water which sometimes even amounted to a complete halt. The sijillat contain many details about the extent of people’s suffering due to lack of water and about the efforts of the imperial and local government to resolve these problems. The registers also contain much information about the water infrastructure in and around Jerusalem, including public fountains, reservoirs and aqueducts, which were regularly supervised and repaired by government employees.

Abla Muhtadi, who is a researcher at the Center for Manuscripts and Documents of the University of Jordan, offered a rare insider perspective on the sijillat mahkame shar‘iyya in her presentation entitled “Jerusalem’s court registers as a source for social history”. In fact, although the prerogatives of the shari‘a courts diminished as a result of the reforms of the judiciary system in the second half of the 19th century, these courts remain an extremely valuable source on the daily life of Jerusalemites. Even after the separation of civil courts according to confession, Christians and Jews at times opted for appearing in front of the qadi instead of turning to the courts of their confessional group. The sijillat contain much information about the holders of public offices, about teachers and schools, shops, restaurants, hospitals and hotels, to name just a few categories of public spaces. In Abla Muhtadi’s words, the sijillat are the “living memory” of the city and its inhabitants, providing the texture of daily life.

The discussions in English and Arabic were stimulating and full of promising perspectives for further connections between different local archives, namely the court registers and the local press in Arabic, Hebrew and Ottoman. Mahmoud Yazbak (Professor of History, University of Haifa) who attended the round-table, offered much valuable advice based on his own work on the sijillat for Haifa and Jaffa and urged the participants to pay special attention to continuities between the period preceding the Tanzimat and the actual reform period. Vanessa Guéno shared her insights about the effects of the judiciary reforms from her work on Ottoman Homs. All the participants agreed that a larger event should be organised next year at the Center for Manuscripts and Documents, whose Director Mohammed Adnan Al Bakhit, has expressed his wish to host such an event.

Photo: two excerpts from the municipal minutes of 1910 (1326 hijri),
the first one being a public bid for meat for the municipal hospital,
the second an announcement of a public sale of tax-farming rights
according to the iltizam system

Round-Table Workshop: New Perspectives for Jerusalem’s Social History

testatasemIFPO

ERC Funded Project

Opening Jerusalem’s Archives:

for a Connected History of ‘Citadinité’

in the Holy City (1840-1940)

Programme for round-table workshop

New Perspectives for Jerusalem’s Late Ottoman

and Mandate Social History:

Sources and Resources in Jordan”

Monday the 24th of November from 9:30 am to 1:30 pm

at the Institut français du Proche-Orient (IFPO) in Amman

9:30 am
Word of welcome by Vanessa Guéno
Opening remarks by Falestin Naili and Vincent Lemire

9:45 am
“Jerusalem, Amman, Beirut and beyond: moving from the Jerusalem municipal archives to the collective memory of Ottoman Jerusalem in search of citadinité (urban citizenship)”
Falestin Naili

10:15 am
“Jerusalem Municipal Archives and Istanbul Imperial Archives: how to interconnect the two levels”
Yasemin Avci

10:45 am
“The Hebrew newspaper Ha-Zvi: a mirror of Jerusalem’s public affairs at the turn of the century”
Abdul-Hameed Al Kayyali

11:15 – 11:40 Coffee break

11:45 am
“Water and its Sources in Jerusalem in the Ottoman period”
Nufan Al Sawariah

12:15 pm
“Jerusalem’s court registers as a source for social history”
Abla Muhtadi

12:45 pm
Synthesis and closing remarks
Mohammed Adnan Al Bakhit

Download the pdf announcement

Jerusalem Municipality and the First World War

Open Jerusalem team member Falestin Naïli will participate to the international conference on “The First World War in the Middle East: Experience, knowledge, memory” jointly organized by the OIB Orient-Institut Beirut, the Ifpo (Institut français du Proche-Orient), the History Department of the Université Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth and the Institute for Palestine Studies (3-4 November 2014) with a paper on “La guerre entre les lignes : la municipalité ottomane de Jérusalem face aux effets de la Première Guerre mondiale.”